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Brendon Bernard

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Brendon Bernard

Brendon Bernard

Brendon Bernard is a Senior Economist at the Indeed Hiring Lab, focusing on the Canadian labour market. His research interests include analyzing how detailed trends in the job market fit in with broader developments in the Canadian economy. Brendon was previously an economist with Department of Finance Canada, where he focused on analyzing Canadian financial sector policy and the U.S. economy. He holds a Master’s in Economics from the Vancouver School of Economics at University of British Columbia, as well as a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) from Queen's University.


Cityscape of the financial district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

How Will the Job Market Influence the 2019 Election?

Cityscape of the financial district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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The job market in Canada is generally in a better place heading into this year’s election than it was in 2015.


Pedestrians on zebra crossing, New York City

Declining Brain Drain? Share of Canadian Job Searches Going to the US Down 36% Since Mid-2016

Pedestrians on zebra crossing, New York City
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US opportunities in academia, science, and tech still appeal to Canadian job seekers.


Graduates in gowns and caps celebrating after graduation ceremony

Recent Canadian University Grads: Slower out of the Gate, but Eventually Finding Their Place

Graduates in gowns and caps celebrating after graduation ceremony
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As they age, recent university-educated Canadians are faring pretty well in today’s labour market.


A young person interviewed by two older female professionals

Canada’s Labour Market Mismatch: Do We Smell Trouble?

A young person interviewed by two older female professionals
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Gaps between job seekers and job openings are prevalent, but haven't grown in recent years


Aerial view of a team of four people huddled around three laptops at the end of a table

Small Business Job Growth in Today’s Hot Labour Market Depends on Business Size

Aerial view of a team of four people huddled around three laptops at the end of a table
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Payrolls of “small” enterprises keeping up, while “micro” businesses lag